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Gleneagle

Gleneagle was a small forestry settlement some 26 kms south of Armadale near the junction of the Albany Highway and Jarrahdale Road. The township was abandoned in the late 1960's. At its height, Gleneagle had a school, a hall, 15 houses, teacher quarters, a forestry office, single men's huts and workshops. During the 1961 Dwellingup and Jarrahdale bushfires, the town served as a fire fighting operational centre providing necessities to all those in battle


 
   
 
 

Gleneagle - Jarrahdale Road

The junction of Albany Highway and the Jarrahdale Road. It is in this area that the settlement of Gleneagle once existed. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG001

 

Gleneagle - Jarrahdale Road

A view up the Jarrahdale Road from the Albany Highway junction. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG002

 

Gleneagle - Townsite Entrance

Two kilometres north of the Jarrahdale Road junction is the site of the old Gleneagle townsite. These days in there is a rest area for motorists. Why Gleneagle was abandoned is somewhat of a mystery. All the buildings were removed apart from the water tower. Perhaps forestry in the Jarrahdale area simply ceased as it became unviable or demand for timber products dropped off? May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG003

 

Gleneagle - Munda Biddi Trail

Just a handful of metres north of the entrance of old Gleneagle townsite is the Munda Biddi Trail. The trail stretches for over 1,000 kilometres from Mundaring to Albany and is designed for off-road cyclists. It crosses the highway here. You can see the highway sign that signals Gleneagle in the picture. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG004

 

Gleneagle - Munda Biddi Trail

The Munda Biddi Trail crosses the Albany Highway here. There is a Stop sign warning cyclists of the busy highway just ahead. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG005

 

Gleneagle - Old Town Road

The access road into old Gleneagle is no more than perhaps one hundred metres long. From there the road splits and encircles the old townsite. The complete circuit is perhaps no more than one kilometre. The road was sealed but has fallen into disrepair although is still navigable for the standard family car. Here is a section of the road in one of the clearings. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG006

 

Gleneagle - Old Town Road

Other sections of the circuit road run through quite heavily treed areas such as this. Gravel tracks run off here and there. In some places, the remains of broken sealed roads run off the main circuit. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG007

 

Gleneagle - Old Town Road

Yet another section of the circuit road. It is interested walking around here and although no ruins exists, it is quite easy to recognise old settlement evidence by way of introduced species of tree such as oak and others which are surviving well. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG008

 

Gleneagle - Water Towers

All that remains of the old town are these water tanks and towers. For some reason they were not removed when the town was abandoned. In the entrance area to the townsite, there is a modern toilet block which would be useful to the Munda Biddi cycling community and passing highway travellers. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG009

 

Gleneagle - Forest Clearing

One of the clearings within the old townsite. This might have been the site of a house or the hall or school. The local school was established in 1939 and closed in 1967. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG010

 

Gleneagle - Robertson House Ruins

Two kilometres south of the Jarrahdale Road turnoff is the ruin of what I believe to be the Robertson house. Just the foundations still exist, no bricks on the ground or other rubble remain. It seems then that the upper structure was purposely demolished and removed. Evidence of the early occupation remains through the continued existence of introduced trees and also a thriving grape vine. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG011

 

Gleneagle - Robertson House Ruins

Another look at the Robertson house foundations. There is a nearby plaque dedicated to June Elsie Robertson 1937-2004. This house was later occupied by the Robinson family at least in the 1950's - 1960's. Evidence seems to indicate that over a century ago this site was the "36 Mile Police Station". 36 miles is consistent with the distance of the site from the Perth CBD. The police station apparently burnt down in 1910. This may have also known as Mahogany Flats police station. Information re the police station is sketchy and needs to be independently verified. May 2014. Photos Ref: GEAG012


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